4 Reasons For Staging an Empty House

Selling a house, especially an empty house, requires imagination. It should receive home staging touches to make the minds of home buyers imagine the household as if they have already moved in to the property. It also serves solid proof of the real layout of the house with minimal furniture and appliances in sight. Here are five of the top reasons why you should engage in home staging before actually having your house listed for sale.

It spreads a feeling of joy and an idea that property is a home soon to the buyer. Whether it is a town house or a condo you are selling, an empty one is a depressing sight to the prospective buyers. Instead of having them imagine and put their own selves in the feet of the owners, it will not set an idea of a good home. Thus, why would a buyer make a good offer if at first glance, it doesn’t set an inviting mood to be their next home?

It gives an idea of how small or wide a room is. Without anything in it, a buyer will be clueless in differentiating the size of a room even if you give its area measurement. But with some furnishings in it, there will be reference points to at least give them an estimate that this room is actually larger that the other one.

Home staging helps give more focus on positive details. An empty house initially sets a negative impression. With this, the prospective buyer will tend to focus more on other negative aspects of the house because there is nothing in sight to give pleasure or at least divert his attention to something that can excite his mood. According to home stagers, the dry walls, wall and floor bumps, and even missing details in built-in cabinets and closets tend to be more observed than what could be no big deals should there be eye-candies in the house.

A well-staged house diverts negative thoughts about the actual reasons behind the selling. While it cannot be avoided that some buyers will actually dig deep into the actual reasons why the seller is letting go of the house, staging can somehow hasten them to speak the idea out. Or at least, they can tame their tongues to somehow choose the right words to extract the answer they want from the owner. according to seller’s agents, an empty house typically gives an idea of financial crisis, divorce, and change of environment because of personal problems.

More Home Inspection Surprises

When inspecting homes, ordinary doors can provide a surprise. Some doors lead to rooms, some doors lead to a dark void, and some doors are curiously locked. Sometimes you get all three.

I was inspecting a large vacation home north of Cashiers, North Carolina, on a fast running creek. It was full of boulders, twists and turns, and waterfalls. The drive to the home was narrow and steep, leading to a heavy gate. The remote the agent gave me worked, and the gates slowly opened on complaining hinges.

The house was beautifully built into the side of the granite ledges, with stunning floor to ceiling windows. Although the home had a small footprint – perhaps 1500 square feet – two stories towered upwards, taking advantage of the very steep lot. The home had been foreclosed on, and was now vacant.

The first part of the inspection on the first floor revealed no anomalies. I started up the stairs to move upwards and noticed a closet door with a deadbolt lock. When you see something like this, owners are usually trying to protect something. Normally I note in the report that I could not access the closet or room, but in this case the bank was the owner and I doubted that they knew anything about this locked door.

I quickly got on the phone to the real estate agent.

“I’ll call the bank,” she said.

Three minutes later the phone rang.

“No one has a key to that door. If we did I’d say enter and report what you find. Can you pick it?”

“I’m no locksmith. No problem, I’ll put it in my report,” I said and hung up.

But I was curious.

I ran my hand across the top of the door trim which is where I “hide” a key. My fingers encountered an object with Velcro stuck to the trim. A key! I put the key in the lock and tried rotating it. It worked! Leaving the key in the tumbler, I turned the knob and opened the door.

A black void.

I pulled out my flashlight and aimed it into the area. A black metal circular staircase came into view. Now I felt like Nancy Drew. I started slowly down the narrow stairs and began to hear the sound of water. When I reached the bottom, my feet were on an uneven stone floor and I was in a room about six by six feet with two more doors in the walls. I looked around for a switch. I found it on the opposite wall. I flipped the switch and light filled the room. I was amazed to see that the walls were carved into the cliff.

One closet was a tiny space with an electrical box. The other door was locked with a deadbolt like the one upstairs.

“Oh! I left the key upstairs,” I said to myself. “Shoot, I’ll have to go back up and get it.”

I went back up the circular staircase to retrieve it. I moved back down the stairs to the locked door. The key worked, and I opened the door. I was in a very narrow passageway. The walls were solid rock and I could see the furrows where blasting caps had been used. I was feeling a little claustrophobic. Should I keep going?

The sound of water grew stronger as I moved slowly down the cavern path. After traveling 12 feet, I was suddenly outside! The waterfall that was visible from inside the home was directly in front of me.

What a surprise! Never underestimate what might be behind a locked door.

Lisa is a North Carolina licensed general contractor and home inspector, and the home improvement columnist for the Clay County Progress. She has designed and built several innovative homes with an eye to low maintenance and simplicity. Lisa founded Your Inspection Expert, Inc., a residential inspection company, in 2008. Experience gleaned from hundreds of inspections form the foundation for the advice in her articles.

Why You Should Consider Living In A Tent

Recently I found myself wondering and talking about some of the quirky and brilliant ways people from around the world use tents. Consequently I pondered about the possibility that some people have contemplated or even opted for living in a tent permanently. Inspired by this idea, I dug a bit further into this topic of permanent tented accommodation.

What would living in a tent full time entail? Some individuals might be unnerved by this idea, while others might be thrilled and excited to take on the challenge and some may have no alternative. Whatever the reason or justification – there are 5 indisputable and great benefits of moving from your modern home to kicking it in a tent.

1. The cost effectiveness is clear

Finding the right location to pitch your tent will definitely decrease your monthly cost of rent, electricity and the like. The idea of saving on your expenses in this matter might seem slightly extreme, but compare it to running a modern household and you may just change your mind. Naturally, you might be concerned about cold winters, no internet and not having warm showers, but there are ways to avoid that. You could invest in a proper tent and enough winter provisions, sign-up at a gym that has shower amenities and use the free internet offered by libraries, coffee-shops and even shopping malls.

2. It will be an invigorating challenge and a noteworthy experience

Having a luxury, purpose-designed, tent will definitely make the experience more comfortable and less effortful, but it will still be a demanding challenge to live in a tent full time. There is, however, a multitude of people who find pleasure, excitement and gratification from such difficult tasks and many people thrive in it! Facing and conquering a challenge like this will without a doubt be tremendously rewarding and enriching. It will not only emancipate you and boost your self-respect and dignity, but it will also offer you a sense of accomplishment being able to live and take care of yourself like our ancestors, before modernism.

3. It will significantly reduce your Eco Footprint

We are all becoming increasingly aware of the importance of reducing and the impact of our Eco Footprint. This starts with being more conscious of leaving less of a negative ecological footprint on Earth and ensuring it is as small as possible. Comparing the running a modern household to living in a tent – it is clear that a tent leaves an immensely small Eco Footprint. If you are already concerned about Earth’s future and reducing the impact you have on Mother Nature – you are most likely thoroughly ready and able to live in a tent permanently.

4. It will allow you to experience forest bathing

Although the thought of submerging yourself in the open waters hidden within forests is enchanting – forest bathing actually refers to spending time amongst trees and is an established way of increasing you happiness and health. Japanese studies have uncovered that the phytoncides released by plants aid in regulating your body, improve the immune system and increases air intake – which leads to happiness and increased health.

5. It offers you a less complicated way of life

Modern life is often characterised by a constant rush and a milieu of complication. Life in a tent forces you to pay attention to the things that are truly important. Tent-living is a way of life that is simpler and more focused on what really matters, as well as a shift in true perspective. Due to few people having experienced a genuine simple life – living in a tent will very much be life changing and meaningful moment.

While researching this article I happened upon an astonishing variety of, what is coined as, glamping tents. Some companies put a double bed and a carpet inside and call it glamping and then others deliver tent structures with flooring, proper windows and doors, bathroom amenities and beautifully decorated interiors.